Marlborough Fly Fishing Show Notes and Thanks

Another year, another Marlborough Fly Fishing Show, and I had a most excellent time. (I hope you did, too.) Even Sunday’s ice storm was fun, albeit in a what-a-disaster-let’s-make-the-best-of-it kind of way. Special kudos to the brave souls who came to my 10am presentation, Lost Secrets of Legendary Anglers. And thanks so much to everyone who attended the other two, Wet Flies 2.0, and Targeting Big Stripers From The Shore. I truly appreciate your support. Next up: Fly Fishing Show, Edison, NJ, Wet Flies 2.0 Seminar, 3:15pm in the Catch Room. See you then!

A lot of talent there. Yet somehow they let that Culton guy in. Humor aside, I enjoy going to other people’s seminars — I’m not only interested in their presentation techniques, but also in adding new arrows to my fly fishing quiver. Ed (both of them), George, and Jason are some of the nicest people you’ll meet. We (the Ed that is Engle) hung out and had a beer Saturday night. Dang, I shoulda taken a picture of that. 

bignames~

Some gorgeous creatures tied by my flatwing brother Joe Cordeiro. I spent a few hours on the show floor Friday shaking hands and visiting old friends. I kept it cheap, managing to get away with just 3 spools of Pearsall’s Gossamer Silk.

JoeCFlatwings.jpeg

~

Old friend Captain Ray Stachelek. I really like a modified version of his soft-hackled bunny fur small squid fly. 

captray

~

Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions makes the world’s best fly tying videos — and he’s also my hero because he gifted me a perfect shot of an October caddis for my Wet Flies 2.0 presentation.

timflags

~

Hat swag, a token of appreciation from the Cape Cod Flyrodders. Thanks, guys! I had a really good turnout for Targeting Big Stripers From The Shore on Saturday, and I was pleased that so many audience members were able to hang around after the talk for some hallway Q&A.

hatswag

~

Wake up, Sunday AM. A slow day at the show, so I checked out George Daniels’, new friend Matt Supinski’s, Ed Engle’s, and later, Jason Randall’s presentations. Oh. And I managed to do one too. How stoked was I to have an audience in the middle of an ice storm!?!

snowday

Some Mini and Micro Buggers for the Small Stream Box

‘Tis the season for replenishing sections of the fly box that have been found wanting. The past few days I worked on streamers for my small stream box. While I like to try new flies, I’ve decided on a simple approach this year: proven patterns that will have me covered in variety of situations. So, here we have small Woolly Buggers and variants, sizes 8 and 12, with tungsten and brass beads (and some thread heads) in three basic colors.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ve color-coded the tungsten beadhead flies with red thread — you can see that on the black bugger in the front right. It’s a simple way to keep track of what’s heavy and what’s not. I’ve also swapped out chenille for Ice Dub on the body. You can find the basic recipe for these small buggers here.

The olive flies on the left are Tim Flagler’s Squirrel and Herl Bugger. The original is un-beaded, but I added tungsten heads to two of them. Hopefully Tim is not too horrified. You can find a tying video for this buggy pattern here.

 

Come to where the fly fishing flavor is

Come to Marlborough country.

The 2017 Marlborough edition of The Fly Fishing Show has come and gone. I attended and presented two of the three days. Here’s my take on the action.

Friday was seminar day. I checked in around 11am and walked the show floor for an hour. I had two goals: reconnect with some old acquaintances (Joe Cordiero, Shawn Britton, Ray Stachelek, Armand Courchaine, Bob Popovics, Roger Plourde) and score some feathers. I found two flatwing-worthy saddles and a reddish-brown hen cape for wets. Off to the big room.

I also wanted to meet a few people I didn’t really know. One of them was Jason Randall. It seems like every time I have a piece in American Angler, Jason has one, too. I like his writing and his scientific approach (check out his pocket water piece in the current issue). I caught the tail end of his “Where Trout Are” seminar, introduced myself, and we got in some quality hobnobbing over the next day. I encourage everyone to do likewise. There’s a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience at these shows. Don’t let the fact that someone is well-known intimidate you — people are here to meet, talk, and share information. It’s a real positive energy.

On the board. I got the chance to meet and talk with Ed Engle on Saturday. He’s quiet, thoughtful, and knows much about fly fishing for trout. I wish we’d had more time to chat.

marl-2017-seminar

If you’re a seminar presenter, you get a badge that says “Celebrity” under your name. While I appreciated the title, I was mindful that I’m still just a guy who loves fly fishing. Good crowd — I was a little nervous that there was only one person in the room 15 minutes before show time, but we ended up with a very strong turnout. If you were among them, thanks for coming to see Wet Flies 101!

Saturday I was first up in Room A of the Destination Theater. Another impressive crowd, and we had to take our Q&A out into the hallway (you have a 45-minute hard stop in the DT). Again, thanks for coming, and thanks for laughing at all my jokes.

Tim Flagler from Tightline Productions (really high-end fly tying videos — I covet his editing equipment and skills) was another person I wanted to meet. I’d only spoken with Tim on the phone, so I caught most of his presentation (excellent!), then bent his ear on cameras and shooting out in the hallway. Tim’s a class act.

marl-2017-dt

I zipped over to Jason Randall’s “Advanced Nymph Fishing” seminar. More good stuff. Jason’s a knowledgeable presenter with a very friendly style. Like Tim, he has some seriously good footage to draw from. Both Tim and Jason made me want to get out on a river post haste. One final lap around the main show floor, and I headed back to Connecticut.

Last but not least, I’d like to thank Chuck and Ben Furimsky for inviting me to play.

Flatwing saddle swag. I’ve got some plans and schemes for these babies (hint: trout).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

~

I ran into Charles McCaughtry at one of the feather booths. Charles is a Connecticut artist and a currentseams follower. He gifted me two sets of notecards featuring his work. What a thoughtful gesture. Love his impressionistic style.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA