Summer Presentation: “The Little Things” at the Long Island Fly Rodders, Tuesday, August 1

Most fishing clubs go on summer hiatus. Not the Long Island Fly Rodders. In fact, they’ve booked yours truly to kick off their fall meeting season with “The Little Things.” I’ve heard rumors of a pre-meeting barbecue, so how can I resist?  Tuesday, August 1, 6:30pm, at the Levittown VFW Hall, 55 Hickory Lane, Levittown, NY. For more information, visit liflyrodders.org.

Speaking of presentations, I’m currently working on “The Little Things 3.0” and an as yet untitled one on how I fish for striped bass.

If you want to catch big stripers like her, pay attention to the little things. (Using a floating line and learning the greased line swing doesn’t hurt, either.)

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TU225 Awarded the Order of the Triple Jalapeño Cheeseburger (with Octoberfest Clusters)

TU225 in Narragansett, RI, has been a long-time friend. They were hiring me to do presentations when I was a nobody (or at least far less of whatever I am today). I truly appreciate their continuous support and kindness. Last night they treated me to dinner (a fed presenter is a happy presenter), and then we had the debut performance of “The Little Things 2.0.” I think it did not suck. But you’d have to ask them.

Afterwards, I went striper fishing. School bass were set up in the current, ambushing silversides on the outgoing tide. Today I notice that parts of my right index finger, thumb, and palm are destroyed.

Yes, it was a very good evening.

Last night’s power supply brought new meaning to the phrase, “the dangle.”

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Fly fishing club guest speaker coordinators, have I got a presentation for you!

Please forgive the shameless immodesty — it’s all meant in good fun. I really am excited about this one, though. It’s a follow-up to The Little Things — hence the highly imaginative title, The Little Things 2.0. You can read more about it here.

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Steve Culton featured speaker at Fly Fishers Club of Harrisburg 69th Annual Dinner

Indeed I was this past Friday night. (You must forgive me, dear reader, for the unabashed title. I’m just engaging in a little SEO gamesmanship.)

The Fly Fishers Club of Harrisburg is unlike any other organization I’ve presented to. They don’t have any dues. There is no formal membership. They meet only once a year at their banquet. The Club is regarded as the second oldest fly fishing club in the US, and was founded by people with names like Charlie Fox and Vince Marinaro.  The nearly 200 attendees — the largest group I’ve ever presented to — ranged in age from 11 to what I’m guessing were octogenarians. So I was quite honored that they deemed me worthy of being their featured speaker.

I got to sit at the cool table. Red dot means beef is what’s for dinner.

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No black tie this year, but as you can see the banquet has always been a rather civilized affair.  Seems I’ve heard of that guest speaker somewhere…

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The Club has some cool traditions, such as the Traveling Rod. Every year a name is drawn, and the winner gets to take the rod wherever and report back on its adventures. Part of the deal is a fishing log book; the winner writes a one-page year-in-review. Recognize that first recipient?

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What would a fly fishing club meeting be without a raffle? This young man was the winner of the dozen wet flies I tied, James Leisenring’s “favorite twelve.” It’s a decent enough mounting job, but I hope these soft hackles spend some time in the water — and tucked into the corner of a trout’s mouth.

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How fitting that they put a winged wet on my name badge. In the interest of full disclosure, I failed to return the plastic holder as instructed. My bad. If they want it back, I guess they’ll just have to invite me to speak again.

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My presentation was “The Little Things.”  It’s a thought-proving 45 minutes that usually generates plenty of good questions. The audience did not let me down.

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Last but not least, I’d like to offer up two of the most important words in our language: thank you. Thank you Fly Fishers Club of Harrisburg. For being so kind and welcoming. For the delicious dinner and libations (a fed presenter is a happy presenter). And for giving me the opportunity to present to you.

Let’s do this again, shall we?

 

 

Presentation menu for fishing clubs and events

One of the more rewarding aspects of being a part of the fishing-industrial complex is sharing experiences and information face-to-face with fellow flyfishers. Having spent years in the corporate/office gulag, I am quite familiar with the concept of “death by PowerPoint.” Rest assured, that’s not how I roll. I love speaking in front of a group, and my presentations are highly interactive. For references and testimonials, please see the comments section below. To book an appearance, email me at swculton at yahoo.com, or call 860-918-0228.

CURRENT PRESENTATIONS

THE LITTLE THINGS 2.0

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If you liked the original, you’re going to love the sequel. “The Little Things” (see below) is one of my most popular programs. It’s easy to understand why – we’re all looking for an edge when it comes to catching more fish. It is my firm belief that the little things are largely responsible for the fabled 10% of the anglers who catch 90% of the fish. “The Little Things 2.0” builds on the theme of seemingly insignificant things you can do make your time on the water more productive.

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THE LITTLE THINGS

Updated September 2017. Same basic content, but now with more video elements, animation, and better transitions. They say that 10% of the anglers catch 90% of the fish. If that’s true, it’s not because those 10% are supernaturally gifted angling demigods. It’s not because they are lucky. It’s because they do a lot of little things that other anglers don’t. As a guide, I have the opportunity to observe how people fish. I see their mistakes as well as their triumphs. When I’m fishing, I am constantly making adjustments and trying new approaches. That’s what The Little Things is all about – seemingly insignificant practices that can make a big difference in your fishing.

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WET FLIES 101

Wet flies have been taking trout for centuries — and the fish aren’t getting any smarter. More and more anglers are discovering that a wet fly is often the best way to match a hatch. Explore the wonders of the wet fly as we cover basics like wet fly types, leader construction, where to fish wet flies, and how to fish them.

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THE EASTERN BROOK TROUT

The only trout that is native to most of the eastern U.S., the brook trout (technically a char) has inspired generations of anglers with its stunning colors, aggressive nature, and often lovely habitat. We’ll cover the basics of small stream wild brookie fishing, from tackle to presentations to where to look for these precious jewels.

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Farmington River

WEST BRANCH OF THE FARMINGTON RIVER

Updated in Spring 2015 with new video, photos, and content. We are truly fortunate to have one of the finest trout streams in the northeast here in Connecticut. There’s something for everyone on the Farmington: classic dry fly pools. Mysterious pockets for nymphing. Spirited runs to swing wets and streamers. A classic tailwater, the Farmington fishes well year round, and offers anglers an opportunity to catch stocked as well as holdover and stream-born wild trout.