Re-thinking this whole scud thing

Scuds are everywhere. In case you don’t know what they are, scuds are freshwater invertebrates. They look a lot like tiny shrimp. You find them on the bottoms of rivers, and where they’re prevalent, they’re an important food source. Scuds are common in many tailwater systems, and I’ve recently come to the realization that I haven’t ever fished them much. That’s been a mistake.

For example, the Housatonic River is loaded with scuds. That I haven’t ever fished a scud fly there seems foolhardy at best. I can imagine the same for the Farmington River. Although the Farmington isn’t known for scuds, a good scud fly will look alive and like something good to eat — so why wouldn’t a trout partake?

To get you started, here’s a great little scud fly from renowned Colorodo guide and new friend Pat Dorsey. It’s called the UV Scud, and you can find the recipe in this tying video. Fish on!

6 comments on “Re-thinking this whole scud thing

  1. carl swanson says:

    Steve, I had a discussion with Neal Hagstrom a couple years back about the scud density in the Farmington. He was explaining that the population is very low due to the fact that the water is coming from deep in the reservoir and most scuds prefer warmer water. It’s not that there are none but the population is low. But I agree, I think a good pattern would present a tasty morsel.

    Carl Swanson Farmington Valley Chapter Trout Unlimited Trout In The Classroom & Youth Education Chair. Harwinton, CT 860.605.6862

    >

  2. David Machowski says:

    An absolute killer at times. In the fall before the spawn I’ve had trout with dozens in their mouth .

  3. Joe GaNun says:

    Scuds are also very prevalent in spring creeks. I have tried and other than one spectacular spring time catch ( a sea run rainbow ) I have never caught anything on a scud pattern. Not exactly making me feel like I’m good at this. I have tried them on the Catskill rivers and the Croton System for a giant donut.

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