The (un)importance of casting

Q: How can you tell you’re on a saltwater fly fishing-based forum?

A: When someone asks about a trout rod, and 90% of the answers focus on rods vis casting and distance rather than presentation.

If you are a long-time reader of currentseams, you will no doubt recall seeing one of my favorite Ray Bergman quotes. For those of you who missed it, its thesis is that it is far more important to be a good angler (leads to presentation acumen) than it is to be a good caster.

I will be the first to tell you that one reason I bought my 10′ 5-weight Hardy Marksman2 was that I could bomb out a 75-foot cast with it. But I’ll also tell you that that distance accounts for 1% of the casts I make on the Farmington every year.

Both casting and presentation are important. But one will deliver the keys to the kingdom much sooner.

This fish was hooked less than a couple rod-lengths away.

Brown release

Quote of the day: Casting vs. Fishing

If Ray Bergman came back today and saw the endless discussions about casting and distance on internet message boards, he would never stop throwing up.

Bergman knew that it was more important to be a good angler than a good caster. Of course, the two are not mutually exclusive. And it is true that it’s hard to be a good angler if you are a poor caster. But I’ll let Ray take it from here. This is from his book Trout:

“That you cast so well that others compliment you for your skill is not so important, but that you handle the flies in some particular and almost indescribable way may be very important indeed. You may gather from this that I am not particularly interested in perfect-form casting, and that is very true…If you become a perfect-form caster while achieving the necessary results, so much the better; but it is best to concentrate on the other points, rather than on form, and the casting will usually take care of itself. In this connection let me say that some of the best fishermen I know could not be called “pretty” casters, but they do cast their flies so that they act the way they should and catch the fish.”

Fish don’t examine the tightness of your loops, your line speed, or how far you cast. This twenty-pound striper certainly didn’t.

Block Island All-Nighter 20 pounds