Housy Mini-Report 12/8/16: Lots of water — action, not so much.

I missed my annual October/November Housy streamer trips this year, so I went yesterday. The HRO website declared that at 860cfs, it was a good time to fish big streamers on a full sink line. I concurred. Sadly, the trout did not. I fished five familiar, favorite pools and came up blank. Not a touch. Oh, I nicked the bottom many times, and sacrificed three streamers to the river gods, but ’twas not my day. Fast water, slower water, pocket water, shallow and deep — bright colors, muted naturals — fast retrieve, slow retrieve, no retrieve — nada. On the positive side, I had the entire river to myself, always a bonus. We’ll get ’em next time.

With both air and water temperatures in the 30s, this is sound advice.

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Farmington River Report 12/6/16: Wet fly action in…December?

Trout blasting wet flies on the swing with a water temp of 36 degrees? Yes, indeed.

I fished the permanent TMA today from 9am-1pm. I was rigged for nymphs, and I spent the first 30 minutes bouncing along the bottom, desperately trying to ignore the growing number of trout slashing at W/S caddis. After the second or third time of telling myself that I was acting like an angler throwing Clousers at a school of stripers feeding on the surface, I disengaged the shot and re-tied the point fly to match the dropper: size 18 soft-hackled pheasant tail. It was by no means a proper wet fly rig, but what the heck — I’m lazy. Second cast, whack! A lovely late fall  wild brown. Next cast, ker-pow! (Those old enough to have watched will recognize the channeling of my inner 60s Batman TV show memories.) And so it went until the hatch waned.

The first fish of the day is always memorable, made even more so when it sports such finery.

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I got out to warm up, and after ten minutes the slashing resumed in earnest. Only this time it was tiny BWOs they were after. The fish proved to be more difficult to catch during this hatch; they wanted the fly on the dangle (if they wanted it at all). By now the sun was up good and proper, and the trout were for the most part hugging the shade line of the eastern side of the river. I had to work hard for the two I landed, but when you’re swinging wets and it’s December and you’ve never had this much success with that method this late in the year, you’re squarely in a no-kvetch zone.

One of the BWO trout, a low teens wild thang.

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But wait, there’s more. We also had a five-minute-blizzard of a midge hatch. I switched to dries for this, and fooled two on a size infinity Griffith’s Gnat, but sadly didn’t stick either fish.

And at this point, I won’t even bother writing about how I blanked on streamers.

On the way out I spoke with fellow guide Mark Swenson. Mark was Euro nymphing and had done quite well (in fact he landed one while we were chatting). He was also fishing small stuff, size 18s.

But for over two hours, I had the river all to myself. Just me, the trout, the bugs, and a December sunshine that made me feel like summer could come any day now.

Book review: 25 Best National Parks To Fish

25 Best National Parks To Fish by Terry and Wendy Gunn, Stonefly Press, ISBN:978-1-63496-904-8, $32.95.

Stonefly Press continues their “Best” (Tailwaters to Fish, etc.) series with this new offering from Terry and Wendy Gunn. Best, of course, is always relative, but you need to make a stand somewhere, right? The authors do a fine job of choosing 25 national parks to fly fish, from the warm salt of the Florida Keys to the bracing salmon runs of Alaska, and from down east Maine to California dreamin’.

Since the authors can’t possibly have an intimate working knowledge of all these wondrous places, they don’t pretend to. Instead, they rely on the first-hand experience of local guides and outfitters. It’s a good strategy, and it lends an agreeable credibility to each chapter.

You will like this book if you are planning on making a pilgrimage to fly fish a national park — or you like to dream about doing so, and maybe this will be the impetus you need to set the wheels in motion. For example, my wife and I have been talking about making a family trip to Grand Canyon. Well, lookee here. Chapter 12, Grand Canyon National Park.

I get an overview map with trail access; general information on the location; specifics about the Colorado River and its tributaries; notes on fisheries management; notable nearby water; and a general list of tackle, gear, and flies to bring. Each chapter includes a detailed short-list sidebar with essentials like logistics information, local fly shops, guides/outfitters, places to stay, where to eat, and even if you’ll find bars on your cell phone. Of course, there are the obligatory scenic view photos and local specimen fish porn. Each chapter is unique in its informational offerings. For example, you might also find details on hatches; resident animal life; and seasonal conditions.

Maybe I’ll start up in Maine with those Acadia salters. Ay-uh.

Have Santa put 25 Best National Parks To Fly Fish on your list.

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Stripers en Espanol

Last week I had the pleasure of guiding Asier and Moncho. They wanted to learn more about linea engrasada (greased line) fishing for striped bass. What was remarkable about the session was that they came all the way from Spain to do it. I’d like to tell you we slayed legions of bass, but we saw only one fish caught in the two hours we were on the water.

But if there ever was an outing where catching was truly secondary, this was it. Moncho speaks limited English (and I know even less Spanish), so Asier served as an able translator. We talked fishing, greased line, Ken Abrames, asked and answered questions, drew diagrams in the sand, exchanged flies and hooks and cigars, laughed at our communication gaps — what an appropriate way to spend the the day after Thanksgiving.

Asier recently posted this in the comments section of my guide service link. I am both honored and humbled by his words. “We come from Spain to learn with Steve, we only spend two hours with him… much more than enough to convince me he is the kind of guide always wanted, the knowledge, the philosophy, attitude, positivism, and of course the way he teach… How much he teach us in two hours in the sea, I can´t imagine how much he can teach in the river…. I really would like to come back and…. let’s try… more!!!!! Thanks Steve, people like you make sense to fishing.”

Three amigos. Moncho is on the left, Asier on the right.

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